Alex Bergdahl & Carl Linnaeus – Time traveler, en osminkad odyssé

8/10

Caution! This is a review on a book in the language of Swedish. Still interested? Read on!
Alex Bergdahl and Carl Linnaeus are among Sweden’s most knowledgable Kiss experts, here investigating the band’s very least investigated era, namely the years when Kiss didn’t wear their iconic make-up. And what a book it is. Just like in their previous three books, the duo goes deep into every album, examining each song as well as the albums as wholes. Less known facts are thrown to the readers, and I swallow eagerly. Furthermore, they add extra chapters on topics such as songwriting partners, videos and ex-members Ace Frehley and Peter Criss. A chapter about when Criss was facing a doppelgänger turns into a veritable thriller! The book easily makes me want to listen to all of the albums mentioned as well as opening my eyes to songs which I haven’t really noticed much before. Furthermore, my curiosity is whetted as to unrelelased things such as Vinnie Vincent’s demos for what could have been the follow-up to “Lick it up”.
Do I miss something? Well, I would have wanted some facts about why Mark Norton was re-christened S:t John and why the splendid tune “Carnival of souls” was omitted from the album of the same name. Also, I would have liked mentions of winks to David Bowie, Eddie Cochran and Little Richard in certain songs. But these are minor complaints. This book is close to perfect for an enthusiast (nerd?) as myself, and I love the sometimes bickering interplay between the two authors.
…and the authors are absolutely right: “No no no” is awesome.

Don't see the comment section above?
Then log in on Facebook to continue.

Alex Bergdahl & Carl Linnaeus – Time traveler, en osminkad odyssé

November 8, 2023

Caution! This is a review on a book in the language of Swedish. Still interested? Read on! Alex Bergdahl and Carl Linnaeus are among Sweden’s most knowledgable Kiss experts, here investigating the band’s very least investigated era, namely the years when Kiss didn’t wear their iconic make-up. And what a book it is. Just like in their previous three books, the duo goes deep into every album, examining each song as well as the albums as wholes. Less known facts are thrown to the readers, and I swallow eagerly. Furthermore, they add extra chapters on topics such as songwriting partners, videos and ex-members Ace Frehley and Peter Criss. A chapter about when Criss was facing a doppelgänger turns into a veritable thriller! The book easily makes me want to listen to all of the albums mentioned as well as opening my eyes to songs which I haven’t really noticed much before. Furthermore, my curiosity is whetted as to unrelelased things such as Vinnie Vincent’s demos for what could have been the follow-up to “Lick it up”. Do I miss something? Well, I would have wanted some facts about why Mark Norton was re-christened S:t John and why the splendid tune…

More exciting reading: